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Qigong

Chi Kung (qigong) is the ancient Chinese art and science of using posture, exercise, breathing, and concentration to gather and promote the strong flow of Chi, or energy, ultimately healing the body and the mind.  Chi Kung is the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine and is both a preventative and a self-healing technique.  It is practiced by more than 80 million people in China and is gaining in popularity in the west.  Students learn to open and control the flow of Chi so that it spreads evenly through the body, eliminating any blockages and, thus, filling any areas of the body that are depleted and draining any areas that are congested.  The combination of meditative techniques and dynamic exercises improve posture, circulation, strength, stamina, flexibility, and concentration.  These exercises are the most basic and can be practised both standing and sitting and are suitable for anyone.

Daoist Yoga

Dao Yin translates as ‘cultivating the chi’, Lung Shen as ‘dragon spirit’ (like the serpentine energy of the kundalini). Dao In is the grandfather of the internal arts dating back to cave drawings that are thousands of years old. This system evolved about 1650 A.D. on Mt. Hua Shan by the meeting of Chi kung masters and kundalini masters. It is a Chinese tradition evolved and practised by Taoist mystics to heal illness, process stress, and slow the aging process. As with all forms of yoga, the rewards are many, including increased flexibility, strength, grace, and endurance. All systems and organs are benefited, including the muscular and skeletal systems, digestion, immune function, oxygen distribution, and lymphatic flow. The endocrine system is also uniquely activated, releasing hormones and endorphins into the body. Dao Yin has the intent of integration of the body, mind, and spirit. The focus on careful regulation of the breath, deep states of relaxation, and specific postures and movements create well-being. Regular practice can help you attain a balance of energy, which promotes the free-flowing activity of the vital energy we call chi. Dao Yin opens the energy pathways so that the chi may flow unimpeded. It can be used for both healing and power in Chinese medicine. Ultimately, with this combination of postures, breathing, movements, and concentration, a resonant chord is struck with the spirit. This integration of the internal and external creates a more sensitive consciousness, a certain enlightened awareness and an overall sense of well-being.